GSBLSU CLASS SCHEDULES

View our 2022 tentative session schedules below.

Note:  All times CST

FRESHMAN & JUNIOR STUDENTS

This year the session will begin on Monday, May 23, 2022.  Freshman and Juniors should plan to arrive on campus by 4:30 pm on Monday, to register and check-in at their dorm.

The Week 2 final exam is scheduled for Thursday, June 2nd  at 4:45pm – 5:45 pm.  Students will be free to leave after this exam on Thursday OR stay until Friday morning.  Buses will begin transporting bankers to the airport from 8:00 – 11:30am.  The dorms will close on Friday, June 3rd at Noon.

SENIOR STUDENTS

Seniors should plan to arrive on campus by 4:30 pm on Monday, May 23, 2022 to register and check-in at their apartment.

Seniors are required to attend graduation on Friday morning, June 3rd at 9:00 AM followed by a reception. The graduation ceremony/reception will last approximately one hour.  Chartered buses will begin transporting bankers to the airport after graduation until 11:30 AM. The apartments will close on Friday, June 3rd at Noon.

Special Guest Speaker: Tuesday, May 24th at 7:00 PM

COLONEL JOSEPH A. MUSACCHIA, JR.
Colonel Joseph A. Musacchia, Jr. is the Director of Staff for the United States Air Force War College (AWC).  He is responsible for the coordination, development, oversight and execution of Air War College operations, serving as the single conduit for High Headquarters tasks. He leads, directs and manages AWC staff actions, budget submissions, faculty travel and executes Air War College special projects. He teaches assigned curriculum using Socratic Method in a seminar consisting of approximately 15 students representing all military services, national guardsmen and reservists, civilians and three international fellows. He assists in the development of new course material or elective courses. He also conducts research which supports the AWC mission and writes for publication and supervises student research.

Col Musacchia earned a Bachelor of Criminal Justice degree, a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminology with a minor in Political Science, a Master of Arts in Criminology from Louisiana State University, and a Master of Strategic Studies from the Air University. He entered the Air Force in 1996 as a Distinguished Graduate of the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps program, Detachment 310 at Louisiana State University.  He is a fully qualified Security Forces officer with more than 25 years of experience.  During his career, he has deployed on numerous occasions supporting joint task forces and real-world contingencies and has extensive leadership background at all levels of command.

FRESHMAN SCHEDULE

WEEK 1

FRESHMAN SCHEDULE

WEEK 2

FRESHMAN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Asset/Liability Management

Stephen Lacewell (Required)

Asset/Liability Management builds on the principles learned in the Bank Performance Analysis and Economics and Money Markets sections by reviewing and understanding the primary risks inherent in the bank’s assets and liabilities.

Before getting into the “nuts and bolts of ALM,” it’s worth reiterating that protecting and growing capital is paramount in banking. If capital disappears, the bank disappears! A bank’s capital must support all of the different risks (credit, liquidity, interest rate, operational, etc.) facing the institution as well as providing a base for growth. Maintaining a level of capital that meets regulatory minimums and the risk profile of the bank requires ongoing monitoring and planning. Prudent ALM is a big part of maintaining adequate capital for your bank.

The presentations in this section include an overview of asset liability management and its four main subcomponents; interest rate risk, investment portfolio management, capital management, and liquidity/funding management.

Building Business Partnerships

Jack Hubbard (Elective)

Building Business Partnerships – Selling has changed radically since Eve completed the world’s first transaction with Adam.  Over the years, the sales approach that seemed to generate the most traction was launched in 1968 when Xerox Corporation created an internal training process that became know as Needs Satisfaction Selling to combat fierce competition in the photocopying industry.  This and the Consultative Selling model that began in 1970, worked very well for decades since the seller knew much more about their product than the buyer.

This elective takes a cradle to leadership look at what it takes to build and sustain a business banking Performance Culture.  You won’t go home with scripts and there is nothing to memorize.  No manipulation or tricks.  Today’s “go to” bankers are Resource Managers who earn that title through respect, value creation and by providing new ideas that help businesses thrive.  When they win, you win, the bank wins, and everyone succeeds.

Credit Analysis for Lenders

Ken B. Cyree (Elective)

Credit Analysis for Lenders is an advanced course designed for the student with commercial lending experience who has a working knowledge of accounting and ratio analysis.  Emphasis will be placed on refining those techniques, which lead to sound commercial lending decisions and becoming a value-added lender.  This includes analysis of ratio trends, working capital, cash flows, developing and using a cash budget, and other important elements in commercial lending operations.

Credit Analysis for Non-Lenders

Gary Higgins (Elective)

Credit Analysis for Non-Lenders is designed to assist less experienced lenders, and others with little or no formal commercial credit analysis training, to assess credit risk.  Emphasis is given to the importance, methods, and limitations of various risk appraisal tools – including those associated with financial statements, ratios, and cash flows.  Case studies are used to demonstrate how these tools are used and how they relate to specific loan requests.  The lender’s viewpoint is stressed through the use of practical examples and interactive exercises.

Credit Risk Management

Gary Higgins (Elective)

Credit Risk Management introduces students to credit risk management in the lending function. Comprehensive credit risk management requires that banks identify and measure risks in the portfolio, develop appropriate policies, procedures, systems and controls to manage and monitor risk and assure that they are working. Portfolio credit risk management is a tool to improve the predictability of portfolio credit quality during economic cycles. A bank study project provides students with an opportunity to assess their institution’s tolerance for risk, to develop a risk profile and assess their institution’s control environment supporting their credit management process.

Financial Markets

Mike Highfield (Required)

An overview of financial markets and institutions. Topics include the role of intermediaries, the nature and functions of money, a review of the time value of money; the level and structure of interest rates; interest rate risk versus price risk; money market and capital market assets; diversification; and the role of derivative assets in risk management. This course is designed to provide foundational finance knowledge for the remaining coursework at the Graduate School of Banking at LSU.

Monetary Economics

Brandon Cline (Required)

Monetary Economics is designed to assist the banker in analyzing and explaining economic conditions and forces.  Topics pertain to the entire banking and economic system, but relate directly to risk management, A/L composition, and other decisions made within the bank.  The course addresses the effects of policy decisions on financial markets; it takes participants “inside” the Federal Reserve as they learn how monetary decisions are made and implemented.  The course provides a practical framework for determining how fiscal and monetary policies affect global, national, and local economies.  Other topics include: economic measures and indicators, regulation, interest rate risk, and the trade-offs associated with economic decision making.

Strategic Bank Marketing

John Oxford, CFMP (Required)

Strategic Bank Marketing  – In a conservative and commoditized industry that provides the market place with little choice due to product parity and regulatory restrictions, how do you make your bank stand out?

From marketing strategy and targeting to brand management, technology and budgeting, participants will develop an understanding of modern bank marketing and take home fresh ideas and tactics on how to make their bank stand out in a sea of sameness.

Upon completion of this course, the participant should have a basic understanding of modern bank marketing, branding, promotions, budgeting, public relations and applicable tactics.  This course will take a deep and exciting dive into the four “Cs” of modern marketing:  Content, Connection, Conversion and Campaigns.

JUNIORS SCHEDULE

WEEK 1

JUNIORS SCHEDULE

WEEK 2

JUNIOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Agricultural and Rural Lending

David M. Kohl       (Elective)

Agricultural and Rural Lending  examines the domestic and global megatrends that impact credit risk and business development opportunities in your rural and agricultural enterprise businesses. Consumer and population trends, rural and agricultural structure, real estate values and intergenerational business transfer is emphasized. The course examines actual small business enterprise cases including underwriting benchmarks, best management practices, common denominators of problem credit, and credit scoring systems applications, including the ten golden rules for operating small business enterprises.

Banking and International Trade

Alvaro Taboada      (Elective)

This course will provide an overview of international trade finance and the key role that banks play in the process.  Topics covered include an overview of the key documents in international trade transactions (e.g., letters of credit, draft, bill of lading) and various international trade financing alternatives (bankers’ acceptances; forfaiting).  In addition, the course will explore the increasing role of FinTech in international trade, which could challenge banks’ role in international trade transactions.

Bank Regulatory Law

Carl J. Chaney      (Required)

The Bank Regulatory Law course is designed to assist bankers in meeting the challenges of the rapidly changing regulatory environment. Topics include regulatory enforcement actions, mergers and acquisitions (including FDIC assisted deals), bank secrecy act, C.R.A., fair lending, bankruptcy, lender liability, and survival tactics for the new financial services industry. Attention is also given to current and proposed legislation as well as discussing the future of the financial services industry.

Banking the Cannabis Industry

Kristen Stogniew     (Elective)

With the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill and more and more states legalizing recreational or medicinal marijuana, it’s likely that you are now banking or will be asked to bank a cannabis related business or individual. This course will lay the foundation to understanding the benefits and risks of providing banking services to cannabis companies and their related enterprises. We will explore some common approaches states have used to regulate the cultivation, manufacture, and distribution of hemp and marijuana products. We will study the regulatory environment and risk mitigation practices that financial institutions have taken when offering loans, deposits, cash management, and other payment services to the cannabis industries.

BSA/AML Compliance

Kristen Stogniew     (Elective)

When it comes to a BSA/AML program, no two financial institutions are the same. This course will explain the regulatory requirements and provide a practical understanding of best practices in staffing, supporting, and administering an effective and efficient BSA/AML program. Driven by risk, it is important the student understands why certain customers, products, and geographies present a higher (or lower) BSA/AML and OFAC risk profile. We will also discuss how technology can contribute to the success of a BSA/AML program, and the regulatory environment for managing third parties and validating their systems as being appropriate for your bank.

Commercial Real Estate Financing

Cal Evans      (Elective)

Commercial Real Estate Financing focuses on the state of CRE (Commercial Real Estate) industry, the techniques used to analyze, finance, and structure real estate transactions, and the current regulatory environment.  The course commences with an overview of the principles of property valuation, and quickly moves into coverage of multifamily, office, retail, industrial, and hotel underwriting and lending.  CRE sector performance is discussed concurrently and is followed by a review of the current perspective of regulatory bodies on lending concentration issues and specific sector risks.  The course ends with instruction on how to create a CRE market intelligence model for your own bank that can strengthen underwriting, identify lending opportunities, and satisfy the demands of regulatory entities.

Evaluating Bank Financial Condition

Paul Allen      (Required)

The Evaluating Bank Financial Condition course introduces the methodology of assessing a bank’s financial safety and soundness through CAMELS analysis.  The CAMELS discussion will also highlight the interrelatedness of these core areas of bank operations.  Students will learn how the supervisory tool, the Uniform Bank Performance Report, is used in a bank’s financial health.

This course will briefly discuss the fundamentals of bank supervision and explain how the adequacy of CAMELS impacts regulatory compliance and the overall strength of banks.  The course is intended provide students with a holistic view of bank operations and related risks, as well as prepare students for bank simulation in year three.

Fundamentals of SBA Lending

Katherine Tohanczyn      (Elective)

Fundamentals of SBA Lending and Understanding the SOP 50 10 – This course explores critical program requirements set forth in the Small Business Administration’s SOP 50 10 to help lenders properly underwrite, originate, service and liquidate 7(a) guaranteed loans. Some areas of focus include: basic eligibility requirements, underwriting to 7(a) credit and collateral Standards, review of Loan Authorizations, overview of the guaranty purchase process and common reasons for denial of liability. The course will also include discussion of real-life cases to allow for a practical understanding of the SBA’s policies.

This course includes only minimal discussion related to 504 Loans, SBA Express, CAPLines and Export Loans.

Introduction to Digital Assets for Bankers

Timothy Peterson     (Elective)

Introduction to Digital Assets for Bankers- This course will introduce blockchain, cryptocurrency, and network economics within the context of traditional banking.  We will tackle the myths and the facts of bitcoin and cryptocurrency, as well as how to work with clients that express an interest in digital assets.

Banking in the 21st century information age will look different than banking in the 20th century manufacturing age.  An emerging economic theory called the network effect explains growth in asset and enterprise values, as evidenced by real world examples that include social media, and global trade.

In a non-technical manner, we’ll explore the fundamentals of blockchain and discuss real-world applications beyond token currency, including the disruption and opportunity blockchain presents to traditional custody services.

In this course you will learn how and why digital currencies have measurable, objective value.  The future of banking, which will include central bank digital currencies, is a key topic.  The applicability of adequacy of existing financial regulation is also discussed.

Leading Through Innovation

Jason Henrichs      (Elective)

Innovation. Digital Transformation. Cultural Change. Everyone nods their heads when these phrases are bandied about, but what do they really mean and more importantly how are they implemented.

Leading Through Innovation is an integrated course, combining theory and actionable steps, for students of innovation in all stages of their innovation journey. The course begins with an introduction to strategy and why the 5 year strategic plan is dead. We swiftly move to alternating modules of innovation best practices and hands on development your own innovation practice. Whether you manage a team, a department or are team of one, these exercises will change how you approach your job, up your productivity and magnify your impact.

 

Leading Through Motivation

Stephen R. Robichaux      (Required)

Much effort has been placed on trying to understand what motivates people and how they learn positive and negative behaviors.  This course will not only address the “what” and “how” of behavior but will also look at the important question of “why” people behave as they do.

The course will explore how applying the principles of motivation can increase performance in an organizational setting.  We will attempt to recognize the uses and limitations of major motivational techniques such as:  monetary incentives, goal setting, performance appraisal, participation, positive reinforcement, and job enrichment.  The focus of this course is learning how to increase performance in the organizational setting.

Managing Bank Performance

Paul S. Allen      (Required)

Managing Bank Performance focuses on two facets of measuring and managing bank performance, and all models, strategies, and discussions prepare students for the Bank Management Simulation course which is completed in the third year of the school. The first portion of Managing Bank Performance identifies the various drivers of bank performance which includes measurement of the drivers and discussions as to how the drivers can be used in concert with each other to achieve the desired goals of profitability. Additional discussions demonstrate how and why these drivers differ between banks of different sizes in the banking industry.

The objective of the second portion of the course is to identify the various risks faced by banks and to develop strategies for managing these risks for the purpose of achieving greater returns. The primary risk subjects to be discussed include interest rate, liquidity, credit, and operational risks. The course includes extensive discussion of Asset/Liability Management modeling inputs and outputs, including the development of assumptions, and the ALM models are presented from the viewpoints of bank management and bank regulatory oversight. Financial derivatives as used in managing bank risk are also presented.

Negotiate to Win for Bankers

James C. Thomas, Jr.     (Elective)

Negotiate to Win for Bankers – Your effectiveness at most of the things you do – whether its bargaining with customers over rates or structure, supporting credits through the approval process, dealing with staff performance problems, sorting out compliance issues with regulators, or simply managing everyday differences with colleagues, clients, friends, and significant others – will to a large degree be determined by how well you negotiate.

Mix in some of our industry’s big trends – commoditization and oversupply (translation:  increasingly brutal competition), customers who feel more powerful, less loyal, and more inclined to negotiate with bankers than ever before, and a major emphasis on improved earnings – and the conclusion is inescapable:  it’s time to improve your negotiating skills.

This course will teach you the very latest negotiating best practices.  Just as importantly, you’ll gain an in-depth understanding of how and why they work, along with the discipline, focus, and confidence to put them to immediate, profitable use.

Recruiting and Retaining the Right Employees

Mark Faircloth      (Elective)

Recruiting and Retaining the Right Employees—In a series of real-life cases, this course presents specific steps and skills which help managers to be effective in attracting and keeping talented employees.  Bankers will learn how to better understand and apply successful interviewing questions, goal setting steps, team dynamics, group communication and individual coaching to a series of actual bank situations.  Special attention is given to talent sourcing, under-performing employees/departments, individual motivation and career path development.

Risk Management and Cybersecurity

Chad Tagtow      (Required)

Risk Management and Cybersecurity is designed to equip bankers with the tools to recognize and manage risk in a rapidly evolving cybersecurity landscape. Banking is all about managing risk. Today’s banker needs to understand the unique risks and threats in today’s cyber-world due to rapid advances in technologies that are critically leveraged in every area of the bank. Topics include managing risk, risk assessment process, risk appetite, cyber-insurance, vendor management, law and regulations, emerging threats, business continuity planning, and incident response. Specific attention is given to breaches, ransomware, phishing, advanced persistent threats, corporate account takeover, and cloud security.

 

Treasury Management

Mark J. Krawczyk     (Elective)

Treasury Management – Understanding what treasury management is – and how to be intelligent about and provide appropriate treasury management products/services to your customers can have a direct impact to the “bottom line.” Your customer’s treasury management operations deal with regulatory and oversight issues, treasury management products/services and short-term borrowing and investment practices and instruments. Understanding what treasury management is and your customer’s service and product needs in this area can play a key role in determining how competitive (translated: “profitable”) your bank can be in the treasury management marketplace. The focus of this course is to see YOUR role as a banker (as well as YOUR bank’s treasury management services/products) from the CUSTOMER’S perspective.

Troubled Asset Resolution

J. Michael Allen      (Elective)

Troubled Asset Resolution – In the past few years, bankers have experienced and are experiencing a period of unprecedented economic challenge.  Asset quality and loan performance metrics have improved for most.  But, as competition once again begins to get “frothy,” these improvements will be tested.   Capital preservation and liquidity are more precious to bankers today than ever before in our modern time.  Virtually all markets are affected.  These challenges are of a depth and breadth few have seen—let alone have experience at handling.  While asset quality trends are improving for the industry, many banks continue to battle troubled borrowers and are desirous of avoiding a “repeat of the past.”  Problem loans are a new reality for some.  How will your portfolio respond to continued pressure?  Are your internal management practices and board activities where they need to be?  How has this environment affected your relationship with your regulatory agencies?  This course is designed to provide some assistance, guidance and provoke thought as to how you handle loan performance challenges in your shop and be positioned to effectively manage the next generation of problem loans that might possibly already reside on your balance sheet.

 

SENIORS SCHEDULE

WEEK 1

SENIORS SCHEDULE

WEEK 2

SENIOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Agricultural and Rural Lending

David M. Kohl       (Elective)

Agricultural and Rural Lending  examines the domestic and global megatrends that impact credit risk and business development opportunities in your rural and agricultural enterprise businesses. Consumer and population trends, rural and agricultural structure, real estate values and intergenerational business transfer is emphasized. The course examines actual small business enterprise cases including underwriting benchmarks, best management practices, common denominators of problem credit, and credit scoring systems applications, including the ten golden rules for operating small business enterprises.

Banking & International Trade

Alvaro Taboada      (Elective)

This course will provide an overview of international trade finance and the key role that banks play in the process.  Topics covered include an overview of the key documents in international trade transactions (e.g., letters of credit, draft, bill of lading) and various international trade financing alternatives (bankers’ acceptances; forfaiting).  In addition, the course will explore the increasing role of FinTech in international trade, which could challenge banks’ role in international trade transactions.

Bank Management Simulation

Anthony McGill (Required)

As a BMSim participant, you will be a member of a management team that has responsibility for the operation of an $800 million commercial bank.  Your team will deal with many of the banking problems faced regularly by senior officers in banks across the country.  Your team will develop strategies for the management of functional bank areas, with specific emphasis on planning and decision-making in areas such as loans, deposits, investments, funds management, asset/liability management, risk management, etc.  The primary focus is on profitability and growth, but attention also is directed to marketing, the pricing of bank services—both current and future, and the management of risk.  BMSim allows students to make decisions, to receive quick feedback on the effectiveness of their decisions, and then to make new decisions which adjust bank operations to compensate for a large number of internal and external forces including competition, the economy, and regulatory constraints.  Within a two-week period, simulation teams experience the equivalent of two years of bank operations.

While BMSim requires a computer for its operation, you have little need for knowledge about computers.  The focus of the exercise is on the management of the bank, and you will probably feel less affected by the computer during your simulation experience than you do in a typical banking situation.

Your knowledge of banking from a senior management perspective may be limited. Suddenly, you are asked to perform tasks that could be foreign to you.  Knowing that the teams you compete against are in a similar state of confusion, you must try to anticipate how their decisions will affect your team’s plans.  This confusion is further compounded by your unfamiliarity with the BMSim decision structure, financial statements, and operating characteristics.  It will also be constrained by time limits, making it necessary to organize and use your time efficiently to address the most critical areas.  Therefore, it is important that you adequately prepare for your participation in BMSim by studying the decision manual and completing any pre-session assignments.

Instructors are available to you during your BMSim program as an additional resource.  Instructors serve only as advisors; they will not offer suggestions on decisions or try to influence a team’s results.  They may ask teams to consider alternative approaches to problems as they arise, but they will not make specific decision recommendations.  However, they may suggest alternatives that you have not considered or question the assumptions that you are making in coming to a decision.  Instructors are an information source for official announcements, changes in procedures, and other details that will contribute to a more successful learning experience.  Instructors will answer questions on the technical aspects of BMSim; but, when you have questions regarding the impact of decisions, you should first ask yourself what would be reasonable, drawing on your own banking experience. The safest assumption is always that BMSim closely mirrors reality.

The decision manual, beginning financial statements and other learning resources are available to you via the program’s website bmsim.cloud.  Over the course of the program, you will be provided with key updates via the website designed to enhance your learning experience.

Banking on Leadership

Rita Floyd (Required)

This course is designed to instruct bankers on the importance of being effective leaders inside and outside their organization by touching on various topics to include ethical leadership, effective communication, positive impact, performance coaching, dealing with conflict and being good stewards in the community.

Bankers should walk away with a better understanding of who they are as individuals and how they can impact others inside and outside their organizations.  They should be able to identify potential career derailers and be able to determine their effectiveness as a leader.

Banking the Cannabis Industry

Kristen Stogniew     (Elective)

With the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill and more and more states legalizing recreational or medicinal marijuana, it’s likely that you are now banking or will be asked to bank a cannabis related business or individual. This course will lay the foundation to understanding the benefits and risks of providing banking services to cannabis companies and their related enterprises. We will explore some common approaches states have used to regulate the cultivation, manufacture, and distribution of hemp and marijuana products. We will study the regulatory environment and risk mitigation practices that financial institutions have taken when offering loans, deposits, cash management, and other payment services to the cannabis industries.

BSA/AML Compliance

Kristen Stogniew     (Elective)

When it comes to a BSA/AML program, no two financial institutions are the same. This course will explain the regulatory requirements and provide a practical understanding of best practices in staffing, supporting, and administering an effective and efficient BSA/AML program. Driven by risk, it is important the student understands why certain customers, products, and geographies present a higher (or lower) BSA/AML and OFAC risk profile. We will also discuss how technology can contribute to the success of a BSA/AML program, and the regulatory environment for managing third parties and validating their systems as being appropriate for your bank.

Commercial Real Estate Financing

Cal Evans      (Elective)

Commercial Real Estate Financing focuses on the state of CRE (Commercial Real Estate) industry, the techniques used to analyze, finance, and structure real estate transactions, and the current regulatory environment.  The course commences with an overview of the principles of property valuation, and quickly moves into coverage of multifamily, office, retail, industrial, and hotel underwriting and lending.  CRE sector performance is discussed concurrently and is followed by a review of the current perspective of regulatory bodies on lending concentration issues and specific sector risks.  The course ends with instruction on how to create a CRE market intelligence model for your own bank that can strengthen underwriting, identify lending opportunities, and satisfy the demands of regulatory entities.

Fundamentals of SBA Lending

Katherine Tohanczyn      (Elective)

Fundamentals of SBA Lending and Understanding the SOP 50 10 – This course explores critical program requirements set forth in the Small Business Administration’s SOP 50 10 to help lenders properly underwrite, originate, service and liquidate 7(a) guaranteed loans. Some areas of focus include: basic eligibility requirements, underwriting to 7(a) credit and collateral Standards, review of Loan Authorizations, overview of the guaranty purchase process and common reasons for denial of liability. The course will also include discussion of real-life cases to allow for a practical understanding of the SBA’s policies.

This course includes only minimal discussion related to 504 Loans, SBA Express, CAPLines and Export Loans.

Interpreting Economic Change

David M. Kohl and Thomas H. Payne (Required)

The commercial banker must interpret domestic and global change and adjust to changing business conditions in all aspects of banking practice.  Bankers are provided with the practical knowledge and basic tools needed to assess the overall economy and its effect on institutional risk and financial performance.  The course includes an analysis of major banking trends associated with economic, competitive, regulatory, political, and social change.  Special attention is given to aspects of economic indicators, both domestic and globally, that impact bankers’ decision making and strategic planning processes.

Intro to Digital Assets for Bankers

Timothy Peterson (Elective)

Introduction to Digital Assets for Bankers– This course will introduce blockchain, cryptocurrency, and network economics within the context of traditional banking.  We will tackle the myths and the facts of bitcoin and cryptocurrency, as well as how to work with clients that express an interest in digital assets.

Banking in the 21st century information age will look different than banking in the 20th century manufacturing age.  An emerging economic theory called the network effect explains growth in asset and enterprise values, as evidenced by real world examples that include social media, and global trade.

In a non-technical manner, we’ll explore the fundamentals of blockchain and discuss real-world applications beyond token currency, including the disruption and opportunity blockchain presents to traditional custody services.

In this course you will learn how and why digital currencies have measurable, objective value.  The future of banking, which will include central bank digital currencies, is a key topic.  The applicability of adequacy of existing financial regulation is also discussed.

Leading Through Innovation

Jason Henrichs      (Elective)

Innovation. Digital Transformation. Cultural Change. Everyone nods their heads when these phrases are bandied about, but what do they really mean and more importantly how are they implemented.

Leading Through Innovation is an integrated course, combining theory and actionable steps, for students of innovation in all stages of their innovation journey. The course begins with an introduction to strategy and why the 5 year strategic plan is dead. We swiftly move to alternating modules of innovation best practices and hands on development your own innovation practice. Whether you manage a team, a department or are team of one, these exercises will change how you approach your job, up your productivity and magnify your impact.

 

Mergers & Acquisitions

Paul Woo (Required)

Mergers and Acquisitions is divided into three parts—the first deals with the financial, regulatory, and social aspects of mergers, the second is concerned with the implementation of the process, and the third relates to the integration and personnel aspects of a merger. Financial and economic considerations include the determination of the cash price or stock exchange ratio and comparisons between the two methods. The implementation takes the process from the pricing phase to the determination of terms and conditions. Critical personnel issues such as job reassignments, terminations and consolidations of positions, and the changes in “corporate cultures” are addressed in practical terms. The course also focuses on the challenges of remaining independent.

Negotiate to Win for Bankers

James C. Thomas, Jr.     (Elective)

Negotiate to Win for Bankers – Your effectiveness at most of the things you do – whether its bargaining with customers over rates or structure, supporting credits through the approval process, dealing with staff performance problems, sorting out compliance issues with regulators, or simply managing everyday differences with colleagues, clients, friends, and significant others – will to a large degree be determined by how well you negotiate.

Mix in some of our industry’s big trends – commoditization and oversupply (translation:  increasingly brutal competition), customers who feel more powerful, less loyal, and more inclined to negotiate with bankers than ever before, and a major emphasis on improved earnings – and the conclusion is inescapable:  it’s time to improve your negotiating skills.

This course will teach you the very latest negotiating best practices.  Just as importantly, you’ll gain an in-depth understanding of how and why they work, along with the discipline, focus, and confidence to put them to immediate, profitable use.

Recruiting and Retaining the Right Employees

Mark Faircloth      (Elective)

Recruiting and Retaining the Right Employees—In a series of real-life cases, this course presents specific steps and skills which help managers to be effective in attracting and keeping talented employees.  Bankers will learn how to better understand and apply successful interviewing questions, goal setting steps, team dynamics, group communication and individual coaching to a series of actual bank situations.  Special attention is given to talent sourcing, under-performing employees/departments, individual motivation and career path development.

Treasury Management

Mark J. Krawczyk     (Elective)

Treasury Management – Understanding what treasury management is – and how to be intelligent about and provide appropriate treasury management products/services to your customers can have a direct impact to the “bottom line.” Your customer’s treasury management operations deal with regulatory and oversight issues, treasury management products/services and short-term borrowing and investment practices and instruments. Understanding what treasury management is and your customer’s service and product needs in this area can play a key role in determining how competitive (translated: “profitable”) your bank can be in the treasury management marketplace. The focus of this course is to see YOUR role as a banker (as well as YOUR bank’s treasury management services/products) from the CUSTOMER’S perspective.

Troubled Asset Resolution

J. Michael Allen      (Elective)

Troubled Asset Resolution – In the past few years, bankers have experienced and are experiencing a period of unprecedented economic challenge.  Asset quality and loan performance metrics have improved for most.  But, as competition once again begins to get “frothy,” these improvements will be tested.   Capital preservation and liquidity are more precious to bankers today than ever before in our modern time.  Virtually all markets are affected.  These challenges are of a depth and breadth few have seen—let alone have experience at handling.  While asset quality trends are improving for the industry, many banks continue to battle troubled borrowers and are desirous of avoiding a “repeat of the past.”  Problem loans are a new reality for some.  How will your portfolio respond to continued pressure?  Are your internal management practices and board activities where they need to be?  How has this environment affected your relationship with your regulatory agencies?  This course is designed to provide some assistance, guidance and provoke thought as to how you handle loan performance challenges in your shop and be positioned to effectively manage the next generation of problem loans that might possibly already reside on your balance sheet.