CLASS SCHEDULE

Students should plan to arrive on campus by 4:00 pm, Monday, May 24, 2021 to register and to check into their apartments. Dinner will be served from 5:00 pm until 6:15 pm. Monday evening classes begin at 6:15 pm for Seniors and 6:30 pm for Juniors and Freshmen.

Daytime classes are scheduled Monday through Friday from 8:15 am until 11:30 am, and from 1:15 pm until 4:30 pm. Evening classes begin at 4:45 pm and are generally completed by 5:45 pm. On Saturday, May 29, Senior classes end at noon.  Juniors and Freshmen do not have class on Saturday.

Freshman and Senior students must be back on campus by 6:30 pm Sunday, May 30 for class.  Junior students will begin second week classes at Monday at 8:15 am.

Week two exams are scheduled for all students from 4:45 pm – 5:45 pm on Thursday, June 3rd.  Graduation for Seniors is scheduled for 9:00 am on Friday, June 4 and should conclude by 10:00 am. First and second year students can depart campus after the exam on Thursday evening or Friday morning. Buses will begin transporting bankers to the airport on Friday morning from 7:30 am until 11:30 am. Apartments will close at Noon on Friday, June 4th.

GSBLSU SCHEDULES

View our upcoming session
schedules below.

FRESHMAN SCHEDULE

WEEK 1 – SECTION 1 & 2

Elective Selections:
Credit Analysis for Non Lenders  |   Credit Analysis for Lenders

FRESHMAN SCHEDULE

WEEK 2 – SECTION 1 & 2

FRESHMAN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Asset/Liability Management

Stephen Lacewell (Required)

Asset/Liability Management builds on the principles learned in the Bank Performance Analysis and Economics and Money Markets sections by reviewing and understanding the primary risks inherent in the bank’s assets and liabilities.

Before getting into the “nuts and bolts of ALM,” it’s worth reiterating that protecting and growing capital is paramount in banking. If capital disappears, the bank disappears! A bank’s capital must support all of the different risks (credit, liquidity, interest rate, operational, etc.) facing the institution as well as providing a base for growth. Maintaining a level of capital that meets regulatory minimums and the risk profile of the bank requires ongoing monitoring and planning. Prudent ALM is a big part of maintaining adequate capital for your bank.

The presentations in this section include an overview of asset liability management and its four main subcomponents; interest rate risk, investment portfolio management, capital management, and liquidity/funding management.

Financial Markets

Mike Highfield (Required)

Financial Markets is an introductory course to the structure, operation, and regulation of modern financial markets. It explores the function, pricing, and institutional structures of financial markets. In addition to introducing different types of financial assets, the course uses the effect of interest rate changes on bond valuation to give bankers insights on the impact of interest rate changes on bank loan portfolios. The course concludes with a discussion of risk and return as well as the use of derivatives in hedging risk.

Monetary Economics

Brandon Cline (Required)

Monetary Economics is designed to assist the banker in analyzing and explaining economic conditions and forces.  Topics pertain to the entire banking and economic system, but relate directly to risk management, A/L composition, and other decisions made within the bank.  The course addresses the effects of policy decisions on financial markets; it takes participants “inside” the Federal Reserve as they learn how monetary decisions are made and implemented.  The course provides a practical framework for determining how fiscal and monetary policies affect global, national, and local economies.  Other topics include: economic measures and indicators, regulation, interest rate risk, and the trade-offs associated with economic decision making.

Strategic Bank Marketing

John Oxford (Required)

Strategic Bank Marketing – In a conservative and commoditized industry that provides the marketplace with little choice due to product parity and regulatory restrictions, how do you make your bank stand out?

From marketing strategy and targeting to brand management, technology and budgeting, participants will develop an understanding of modern bank marketing and take-home fresh ideas and tactics on how to make their bank stand out in a sea of sameness.

Building Business Partnerships

Jack Hubbard (Elective)

Building Business Partnerships—Selling has changed radically since Eve completed the world’s first transaction with Adam. Over the years, the sales approach that seemed to generate the most traction was launched in 1968 when Xerox Corporation created an internal training process that became known as Needs Satisfaction Selling to combat fierce competition in the photocopying industry. This and the Consultative Selling model that began in 1970, worked very well for decades since the seller knew much more about their product than the buyer.

That all changed with the advent of the internet and social media. Today, the buyer has seized greater control of the process and the banker must be more prepared and better ready to execute than ever before. This is the era of Trust-Based Selling where the customer and the banker work collaboratively to develop and find a best-fit solution. Selling is no longer me versus you. In today’s competitive environment it’s you and me versus the problem.

This elective takes a cradle to leadership look at what it takes to build and sustain a business banking Performance Culture. You won’t go home with scripts and there is nothing to memorize. No manipulation or tricks. Todays “go to” bankers are Resource Managers who earn that title through respect, value creation and by providing new ideas that help businesses thrive. When they win, you win, the bank wins, and everyone succeeds.

Credit Analysis for Lenders

Ken B. Cyree (Elective)

Credit Analysis for Lenders is an advanced course designed for the student with commercial lending experience who has a working knowledge of accounting and ratio analysis.  Emphasis will be placed on refining those techniques, which lead to sound commercial lending decisions and becoming a value-added lender.  This includes analysis of ratio trends, working capital, cash flows, developing and using a cash budget, and other important elements in commercial lending operations.

Credit Analysis for Non-Lenders

Gary Higgins (Elective)

Credit Analysis for Non-Lenders is designed to assist less experienced lenders, and others with little or no formal commercial credit analysis training, to assess credit risk.  Emphasis is given to the importance, methods, and limitations of various risk appraisal tools – including those associated with financial statements, ratios, and cash flows.  Case studies are used to demonstrate how these tools are used and how they relate to specific loan requests.  The lender’s viewpoint is stressed through the use of practical examples and interactive exercises.

Credit Risk Management

Gary Higgins (Elective)

Credit Risk Management introduces students to credit risk management in the lending function. Comprehensive credit risk management requires banks to identify and measure risks in the portfolio.  Additionally, Banks must develop appropriate policies, procedures, systems and controls to manage and monitor risk and assure that they are working. Portfolio credit risk management is a tool to improve the predictability of portfolio credit quality during economic cycles.

 

JUNIORS SCHEDULE

WEEK 1 – SECTION 1 & 2

Elective Selections:
Mergers and Acquisitions   |   Negotiate to Win for Bankers   |   Recruiting & Retaining Employees  |   SBA Lending

JUNIORS SCHEDULE

WEEK 2 – SECTION 1 & 2

Elective Selections:
Commercial Real Estate Financing   |  Rural & Agricultural Lending   |   Treasury Mgt.  |  Troubled Asset Resolution

Communications & Crisis Mgt.   |   Leading Though Innovation 

JUNIOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Bank Regulatory Law

Carl J. Chaney (Required)

The Bank Regulatory Law course is designed to assist bankers in meeting the challenges of the rapidly changing regulatory environment. Topics include regulatory enforcement actions, mergers and acquisitions (including FDIC assisted deals), bank secrecy act, C.R.A., fair lending, bankruptcy, lender liability, and survival tactics for the new financial services industry. Attention is also given to current and proposed legislation as well as discussing the future of the financial services industry.

Evaluating Bank Financial Condition

Rhoshunda Kelly (Required)

The Evaluating Bank Financial Condition course is the complement to the Managing Bank Performance course and will introduce the methodology of assessing a bank’s financial safety and soundness through CAMELS analysis.  The CAMELS discussion will also highlight the interrelatedness of these core areas of bank operations.  Students will learn how to effectively evaluate their bank’s financial condition and develop a risk profile using the Uniform Bank Performance Report.

This course will briefly discuss the fundamentals of bank supervision and explain how the adequacy of CAMELS impacts regulatory compliance and the overall strength of banks.  The course is intended to provide students with a holistic view of bank operations and related risks.

Managing Bank Performance

Paul S. Allen (Required)

Managing Bank Performance focuses on measuring and managing bank performance, using ratio and peer analysis.  The course discussion will include an overview of a typical bank balance sheet and income statement, the definition and use of commonly used ratios, and will use case studies to illustrate how to evaluate bank performance.  The concepts, analysis tools and strategies are intended to prepare students for the Bank Management Simulation course which is completed in the third year of the school.

Risk Management and Cybersecurity

Chad Tagtow (Required)

The Risk Management and Cybersecurity course is designed to equip bankers with the tools to recognize and manage risk in a rapidly evolving landscape. Banking is all about managing risk. Today’s banker needs to understand the unique risks and threats in today’s cyber-world due to rapid advances in technologies that are critically leveraged in every area of the bank.

This course will focus on the risk management process, performing a risk assessment, and identifying potential mitigating controls to reduce risk. Since risk exists in every area of the bank, properly managing risk is key to a bank’s success.

This course will also focus heavily on Cybersecurity and emerging risks. As the banking landscape changes due to the adoption of technology driven solutions, risk management grows increasingly important. Cybersecurity is often incorrectly classified as the responsibility of the Information Technology department. Cybersecurity is simply a specialized area of risk management, which is the responsibility of the bank’s management.

Commercial Real Estate Financing

Cal Evans (Elective)

Commercial Real Estate Financing focuses on the state of CRE (Commercial Real Estate) industry, the techniques used to analyze, finance, and structure real estate transactions, and the current regulatory environment.  The course commences with an overview of the principles of property valuation, and quickly moves into coverage of multifamily, office, retail, industrial, and hotel underwriting and lending.  CRE sector performance is discussed concurrently and is followed by a review of the current perspective of regulatory bodies on lending concentration issues and specific sector risks.  The course ends with instruction on how to create a CRE market intelligence model for your own bank that can strengthen underwriting, identify lending opportunities, and satisfy the demands of regulatory entities.

Communications & Crisis Management

Ron Sachs (Elective)

Communications & Crisis Management – Understanding the importance of protecting the brand of any organization is at the heart of this relevant course. Organizations that don’t engage in regular public relations and community service fade in the marketplace and risk losing customer/public/opinion leader support if a real problem ever becomes public.

A brand crisis can victimize any organization – in the public, private and non-profit sectors – and the best way to be prepared for one is to accept this harsh reality. Disciplined strategies to pro-actively promote an organization’s brand is a vital component to positively position the organization. It also serves to insulate the organization against the possibility or likelihood of ‘bad news’ that may happen at any point – or to lessen the potential impact of an actual crisis.

The course will present multiple ways for organizations to ‘buff’ their brands with active media relations efforts. This includes how best to promote strategically beneficial community service and philanthropy as a matter of ongoing priority — and how to develop productive relationships with select news media.

Fundamentals of SBA Lending

Katherine Tohanczyn (Elective)

Fundamentals of SBA Lending and Understanding the SOP 50 10

This course explores critical program requirements set forth in the Small Business Administration’s SOP 50 10 to help lenders properly underwrite, originate, service and liquidate 7(a) guaranteed loans. Some areas of focus include: basic eligibility requirements, underwriting to 7(a) credit and collateral Standards, review of Loan Authorizations, overview of the guaranty purchase process and common reasons for denial of liability. The course will also include discussion of real-life cases to allow for a practical understanding of the SBA’s policies.

This course includes only minimal discussion related to 504 Loans, SBA Express, CAPLines and Export Loans.

Leading Through Innovation

Jason Henrichs (Elective)

Leading Through Innovation—Innovation. Digital Transformation. Cultural Change. Everyone nods their heads when these phrases are bandied about, but what do they really mean and more importantly how are they implemented.

Leading Through Innovation is an integrated course, combining theory and actionable steps, for students of innovation in all stages of their innovation journey. The course begins with an introduction to strategy and why the 5-year strategic plan is dead. We swiftly move to alternating modules of innovation best practices and hands on developing your own innovation practice. Whether you manage a team, a department or are team of one, these exercises will change how you approach your job, up your productivity and magnify your impact.

Mergers and Acquisitions

Chris L. Hargrove (Elective)

Mergers and Acquisitions is divided into three parts—the first deals with the financial, regulatory and social aspects of mergers, the second is concerned with the implementation of the process, and the third relates to the integration and personnel aspects of a merger. Financial and economic considerations include the determination of the cash price or stock exchange ratio and comparisons between the two methods. The implementation takes the process from the pricing phase to the determination of terms and conditions. Critical personnel issues such as job reassignments, terminations and consolidations of positions, and the changes in “corporate cultures” are addressed in practical terms. The course also focuses on the challenges of remaining independent.

Negotiate to Win for Bankers

James C. Thomas, Jr. (Elective)

Negotiate to Win for Bankers – Your effectiveness at most of the things you do – whether its bargaining with customers over rates or structure, supporting credits through the approval process, dealing with staff performance problems, sorting out compliance issues with regulators, or simply managing everyday differences with colleagues, clients, friends, and significant others – will to a large degree be determined by how well you negotiate.

Mix in some of our industry’s big trends – commoditization and oversupply (translation:  increasingly brutal competition), customers who feel more powerful, less loyal, and more inclined to negotiate with bankers than ever before, and a major emphasis on improved earnings – and the conclusion is inescapable:  it’s time to improve your negotiating skills.

This course will teach you the very latest negotiating best practices.  Just as importantly, you’ll gain an in-depth understanding of how and why they work, along with the discipline, focus, and confidence to put them to immediate, profitable use.

Recruiting and Retaining the Right Employees

Mark Faircloth (Elective)

Recruiting and Retaining the Right Employees—In a series of real-life cases, this course presents specific steps and skills which help managers to be effective in attracting and keeping talented employees.  Bankers will learn how to better understand and apply successful interviewing questions, goal setting steps, team dynamics, group communication and individual coaching to a series of actual bank situations.  Special attention is given to talent sourcing, under-performing employees/departments, individual motivation and career path development.

Rural & Agricultural Business Lending

David M. Kohl (Elective)

Rural & Agricultural Business Lending  examines the domestic and global megatrends that impact credit risk and business development opportunities in your rural and agricultural enterprise businesses. Consumer and population trends, rural and agricultural structure, real estate values and intergenerational business transfer is emphasized. The course examines actual small business enterprise cases including underwriting benchmarks, best management practices, common denominators of problem credit, and credit scoring systems applications, including the ten golden rules for operating small business enterprises.

Treasury Management

Mark J. Krawczyk (Elective)

Treasury Management – Understanding what treasury management is – and how to be intelligent about and provide appropriate treasury management products/services to your customers can have a direct impact to the “bottom line.” Your customer’s treasury management operations deal with regulatory and oversight issues, treasury management products/services and short-term borrowing and investment practices and instruments. Understanding what treasury management is and your customer’s service and product needs in this area can play a key role in determining how competitive (translated: “profitable”) your bank can be in the treasury management marketplace. The focus of this course is to see YOUR role as a banker (as well as YOUR bank’s treasury management services/products) from the CUSTOMER’S perspective.

Troubled Asset Resolution

J. Michael Allen (Elective)

Troubled Asset Resolution – In the past few years, bankers have experienced and are experiencing a period of unprecedented economic challenge.  Asset quality and loan performance metrics have improved for most.  But, as competition once again begins to get “frothy,” these improvements will be tested.   Capital preservation and liquidity are more precious to bankers today than ever before in our modern time.  Virtually all markets are affected.  These challenges are of a depth and breadth few have seen—let alone have experience at handling.  While asset quality trends are improving for the industry, many banks continue to battle troubled borrowers and are desirous of avoiding a “repeat of the past.”  Problem loans are a new reality for some.  How will your portfolio respond to continued pressure?  Are your internal management practices and board activities where they need to be?  How has this environment affected your relationship with your regulatory agencies?  This course is designed to provide some assistance, guidance and provoke thought as to how you handle loan performance challenges in your shop and be positioned to effectively manage the next generation of problem loans that might possibly already reside on your balance sheet.

 

SENIORS SCHEDULE

WEEK 1 – SECTION 1 & 2

Elective Selections:
Mergers & Acquisitions  |  Negotiate to Win for Bankers  |    Recruiting & Retaining Employees  |    SBA Lending

SENIORS SCHEDULE

WEEK 2 – SECTION 1 & 2

Elective Selections:
Commercial Real Estate Financing  |  Rural & Agricultural Business Lending   |   Troubled Asset Resolution

SENIOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Bank Management Simulation

Ernest W. Swift (Required)

Bank Management Simulation utilizes a computer-based learning exercise designed to give participants an overview of the bank management decision-making process.  Students develop strategies for the management of functional bank areas, with specific emphasis on planning and decision-making in areas such as loans, deposits, investments, funds management, asset/liability management, risk management, etc.  The primary focus is on profitability and growth, but attention also is directed to marketing, the pricing of bank services—both current and future, and the management of risk.

The senior class is divided into teams, with each team effectively managing an $800 million dollar bank.  The computer model allows students to make decisions, to receive quick feedback on the effectiveness of their decisions, and then to make new decisions which adjust bank operations to compensate for a large number of internal and external forces including competition, the economy, and regulatory constraints.  Within a two-week period, simulation teams experience the equivalent of two years of bank operations.

The course is supervised by qualified instructors who have extensive real-world banking experience as CEOs, presidents, or examiners.  The computer model, (BMSim) or Bank Management Simulation, was developed by the ABA and currently is maintained by a consortium of regional banking schools.

Banking on Leadership

Rita Floyd (Required)

Banking on Leadership – This course is designed to instruct bankers on the importance of being effective leaders inside and outside their organizations by touching on various topics to include ethical leadership, effective communication, positive impact, performance coaching, dealing with conflict and being good stewards in the community.

Interpreting Economic Change

David M. Kohl and Thomas H. Payne (Required)

Interpreting Economic Change – Commercial bankers must interpret domestic and global change and adjust to changing business conditions in all aspects of banking practice.  Interpreting Economic Change provides participants with the practical knowledge and basic tools needed to assess the overall economy and its effect on institutional risk and financial performance.  Special attention is given to economic and “megatrend” indicators that drive bankers’ decision making and strategic planning processes. With a focus on relevant tools and applications, this interactive course provides a practical overview of the causes and implications of interest rate, workforce productivity, fiscal and monetary policy, exchange rate, global risk, societal, and political change.

Leadership in Times of Change

Stephen R. Robichaux (Required)

Leadership in Times of Change – The banking industry is in the spotlight and Leadership in Times of Change engages the participants in an interactive learning process aimed at leading through the current crisis. Leadership theories that have dominated our thinking and practice for the last century are presented and summarized into a relevant whole that provides a firm foundation for today’s leaders. Leadership styles are presented and assessed, and leadership levels are linked to effectiveness in today’s tough markets. Exercises and tools for leading organizational change are presented to help leaders succeed in today’s complex organizations and business environment. A model for personal leadership development is presented for participants to continue their life-long process of growth.

Commercial Real Estate Financing

Cal Evans (Elective)

Commercial Real Estate Financing focuses on the state of CRE (Commercial Real Estate) industry, the techniques used to analyze, finance, and structure real estate transactions, and the current regulatory environment.  The course commences with an overview of the principles of property valuation, and quickly moves into coverage of multifamily, office, retail, industrial, and hotel underwriting and lending.  CRE sector performance is discussed concurrently and is followed by a review of the current perspective of regulatory bodies on lending concentration issues and specific sector risks.  The course end with instruction on how to create a CRE market intelligence model for your own bank that can strengthen underwriting, identify lending opportunities, and satisfy the demands of regulatory entities.

Fundamentals of SBA Lending

Katherine Tohanczyn (Elective)

Fundamentals of SBA Lending and Understanding the SOP 50 10

This course explores critical program requirements set forth in the Small Business Administration’s SOP 50 10 to help lenders properly underwrite, originate, service and liquidate 7(a) guaranteed loans. Some areas of focus include: basic eligibility requirements, underwriting to 7(a) credit and collateral Standards, review of Loan Authorizations, overview of the guaranty purchase process and common reasons for denial of liability. The course will also include discussion of real-life cases to allow for a practical understanding of the SBA’s policies.

This course includes only minimal discussion related to 504 Loans, SBA Express, CAPLines and Export Loans.

Mergers and Acquisitions

Chris L. Hargrove (Elective)

Mergers and Acquisitions is divided into three parts—the first deals with the financial, regulatory and social aspects of mergers, the second is concerned with the implementation of the process, and the third relates to the integration and personnel aspects of a merger. Financial and economic considerations include the determination of the cash price or stock exchange ratio and comparisons between the two methods. The implementation takes the process from the pricing phase to the determination of terms and conditions. Critical personnel issues such as job reassignments, terminations and consolidations of positions, and the changes in “corporate cultures” are addressed in practical terms. The course also focuses on the challenges of remaining independent.

Negotiate to Win for Bankers

James C. Thomas, Jr. (Elective)

Negotiate to Win for Bankers – Your effectiveness at most of the things you do – whether its bargaining with customers over rates or structure, supporting credits through the approval process, dealing with staff performance problems, sorting out compliance issues with regulators, or simply managing everyday differences with colleagues, clients, friends, and significant others – will to a large degree be determined by how well you negotiate.

Mix in some of our industry’s big trends – commoditization and oversupply (translation:  increasingly brutal competition), customers who feel more powerful, less loyal, and more inclined to negotiate with bankers than ever before, and a major emphasis on improved earnings – and the conclusion is inescapable:  it’s time to improve your negotiating skills.

This course will teach you the very latest negotiating best practices.  Just as importantly, you’ll gain an in-depth understanding of how and why they work, along with the discipline, focus, and confidence to put them to immediate, profitable use.

Recruiting and Retaining the Right Employees

Mark Faircloth (Elective)

Recruiting and Retaining the Right Employees – In a series of real-life cases, this course presents specific steps and skills which help managers to be effective in attracting and keeping talented employees.  Bankers will learn how to better understand and apply successful interviewing questions, goal setting steps, team dynamics, group communication and individual coaching to a series of actual bank situations.  Special attention is given to talent sourcing, under-performing employees/departments, individual motivation and career path development.

Rural and Agricultural Business Lending

David M. Kohl (Elective)

Rural and Agricultural Business Lending examines the domestic and global megatrends that impact credit risk and business development opportunities in your rural and agricultural enterprise businesses. Consumer and population trends, rural and agricultural structure, real estate values and intergenerational business transfer is emphasized. The course examines actual small business enterprise cases including underwriting benchmarks, best management practices, common denominators of problem credit, and credit scoring systems applications, including the ten golden rules for operating small business enterprises.

Troubled Asset Resolution

J. Michael Allen (Elective)

Troubled Asset Resolution – In the past few years, bankers have experienced and are experiencing a period of unprecedented economic challenge.  Asset quality and loan performance metrics have improved for most.  But, as competition once again begins to get “frothy,” these improvements will be tested.   Capital preservation and liquidity are more precious to bankers today than ever before in our modern time.  Virtually all markets are affected.  These challenges are of a depth and breadth few have seen—let alone have experience at handling.  While asset quality trends are improving for the industry, many banks continue to battle troubled borrowers and are desirous of avoiding a “repeat of the past.”  Problem loans are a new reality for some.  How will your portfolio respond to continued pressure?  Are your internal management practices and board activities where they need to be?  How has this environment affected your relationship with your regulatory agencies? Troubled Asset Resolution is designed to provide some assistance, guidance and provoke thought as to how you handle loan performance challenges in your shop and be positioned to effectively manage the next generation of problem loans that might possibly already reside on your balance sheet.